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Tamarind : Tamarindus indica


Tamarindus indica TamarindTamarind is an interesting plant because its an important spice plant. In fact its the only important spice plant to come from African origins. The unripe fruit or pulp of ripe pods are used to make a sour or tart spice.

Often Tamarind is placed in its own family, the Caesalpiniaceae, which is very closely related to the Fabaceae.

Its found here growing on the UH campus behind Dean hall.

 

Tamarind Tamarindus indicaPhoto: Rob Nelson

Model: Hina

 

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Text by Rob Nelson

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